the-phandom-toll-booth:

phunkyvanspam:

dragember:

dragember:

silversarcasm:

can we stop funding research to find what ‘causes’ autism and instead use that money to make life more accessible and more comfortable for autistic people

Finding out the cause and other factors of autism makes it easier to make treatments and other methods…

Actually having the disability doesn’t mean you understand it (the science behind it) or whatever works for you will work for anyone else. Yes, whether you have autism or not, and frankly your are just exposing your ignorance. People are all different, and will respond differently to different things.

Children in particular don’t have the ability to communicate what they’re experiencing nor do they have the tools available to them to help make the world more accessible.

Obviously you are unaware there’s a vast spectrum of autism - some individuals having it to a lesser degree and those who have it to a stronger severity.

Furthermore, studying austism leads to better treatment plans. Did you know autism is linked with seizures? 35% of children with autism develop clinical seizures. Autism is also strongly linked with epilepsy as well. But no, I suppose that’s not worth researching, they can just deal with it on their own. They need to learn how to self cope.

Did you know with more severe instances of autism, children are known to cause self injury? Should we find proper ways to address this? Research what is an effective method to healthily prevent self harm? No, we should just let those children figure it out themselves. You know, self injury is linked to biochemical imbalances, this isn’t something you can just ask an individual with the disorder how they cope with that. That’s something that needs to be MEDICALLY ADDRESSED.

Regardless of the disability, research is necessary to progress the understanding of whatever the disorder or physical impairment is and expand treatment options for those individuals. Research in autism, and what causes it, has lead to a better understanding of precisely how to help people with autism, as they experience the world differently than other people. There have been phenomenal results with different methods varying from paint therapy to medication to help subside seizures.

Not everyone can just “magically” cope with whatever disorder or disability they have (keeping in mind many disorders come is a VAST SPECTRUM of severity). You can’t make programs to make life more easy and accessible for people with certain disorders without medical research evaluating the science of the issue. You can’t have one without the other.

http://www.autism.com/

I really can’t believe this is even a controversy, Jesus fuck.

Yes, as a matter of fact I already knew everything that you said and my point still stands.

For your information? Many autistic people self-harm out of frustration because they don’t know how else to tell others that something isn’t right! It is, unfortunately, sometimes the only method of communication a non-verbal autistic can illicit a response from a neurotypical person.

Self-harm isn’t a good thing and should be stopped, sure, but there *are* reasons for it. But instead of figuring out what is actually wrong, many caregivers and so-called experts think the best thing to do is prevent them from hurting themselves instead of trying to find out the problem which is causing the self-harm! There have been many instances where the problem was fixed (could even be something like a flickering lightbulb driving them up the wall, or some sensory thing like that) and the autistic child ceased hurting themselves.

Re: Seizures and epilepsy. Paired with autism, it is a CO-MORBID CONDITION. (just like depression, ADHD, etc which many people with autism also can have) It’s possibly made worse when it comes to sensory overload that autistic people with epilepsy face. Even so, autism does NOT equal epilepsy and vice versa and I think they should be treated as separate things.

Sure, I don’t have epilepsy so I can’t say much about it but I know there’s probably someone out there on the autism spectrum who does that is willing to weigh in on how they deal with it. They may be just one of thousands of people with autism who suffer from seizures but it wouldn’t hurt to just LISTEN to them. 

But that right there brings up my original statement, and your response to me proves this even more. People like you think they know a hell of a lot more than people who actually have autism. It seems like every time an autistic person brings up suggestions as to how they think *their* health, *their* life should be dealt with, a neurotypical person has to butt in and say “No, you’re wrong! You don’t really know that. You should listen to ME because I know BEST”

What, you think I only base my opinion on assumptions and personal experiences? I’ve done my own research- have been researching autism since I was diagnosed at age 14. I’ve communicated with other autistic people (in various degrees of the spectrum) for YEARS. We’ve shared ideas and coping mechanisms. I KNOW that something that works for someone would not necessarily work for me. I’ve learned that first-hand! 

You can’t honestly tell me that listening to people who actually have autism will prevent doctors and scientists from coming up with ways to help them out. The sharing of ideas is important when it comes to forming conclusions! 

I really can’t believe this is even a controversy, Jesus fuck.

This is probably the only thing we will ever agree on.

Good day!

This started out as an argument on whether we should be funding research on helping autistic people or funding finding the cause. Both users seems to agree that it’s important to research and find ways to help people with autism…why is there an argument? Finding the reason for it is important and all, but it doesn’t give solutions that will help people cope with autism. It’s not like a disease with a cure, so the ‘why’ won’t equal a solution. The important thing is to learn how to help and understand. That’s what everyone here wants, right?

You’re exactly right. That is what people should be doing.

However, there seems to be a HUGE amount of people who don’t even seem to care about autistic people’s current quality of life. It’s as if there was a cure to the disorder, all the autistic people’s problems will automatically be solved.

And, unfortunately, the majority of groups that promote autism research are not going toward helping out the autistic people themselves, but to prevention and finding a cure that will most likely never happen. Considering that genetics is a large contributor to who has autism and who doesn’t, prevention would most likely go lead toward eugenic practices, like abortion following detection in the womb, like what’s happening with Down’s syndrome.

dragember:

dragember:

silversarcasm:

can we stop funding research to find what ‘causes’ autism and instead use that money to make life more accessible and more comfortable for autistic people

Finding out the cause and other factors of autism makes it easier to make treatments and other methods…

Actually having the disability doesn’t mean you understand it (the science behind it) or whatever works for you will work for anyone else. Yes, whether you have autism or not, and frankly your are just exposing your ignorance. People are all different, and will respond differently to different things.

Children in particular don’t have the ability to communicate what they’re experiencing nor do they have the tools available to them to help make the world more accessible.

Obviously you are unaware there’s a vast spectrum of autism - some individuals having it to a lesser degree and those who have it to a stronger severity.

Furthermore, studying austism leads to better treatment plans. Did you know autism is linked with seizures? 35% of children with autism develop clinical seizures. Autism is also strongly linked with epilepsy as well. But no, I suppose that’s not worth researching, they can just deal with it on their own. They need to learn how to self cope.

Did you know with more severe instances of autism, children are known to cause self injury? Should we find proper ways to address this? Research what is an effective method to healthily prevent self harm? No, we should just let those children figure it out themselves. You know, self injury is linked to biochemical imbalances, this isn’t something you can just ask an individual with the disorder how they cope with that. That’s something that needs to be MEDICALLY ADDRESSED.

Regardless of the disability, research is necessary to progress the understanding of whatever the disorder or physical impairment is and expand treatment options for those individuals. Research in autism, and what causes it, has lead to a better understanding of precisely how to help people with autism, as they experience the world differently than other people. There have been phenomenal results with different methods varying from paint therapy to medication to help subside seizures.

Not everyone can just “magically” cope with whatever disorder or disability they have (keeping in mind many disorders come is a VAST SPECTRUM of severity). You can’t make programs to make life more easy and accessible for people with certain disorders without medical research evaluating the science of the issue. You can’t have one without the other.

http://www.autism.com/

I really can’t believe this is even a controversy, Jesus fuck.

Yes, as a matter of fact I already knew everything that you said and my point still stands.

For your information? Many autistic people self-harm out of frustration because they don’t know how else to tell others that something isn’t right! It is, unfortunately, sometimes the only method of communication a non-verbal autistic can illicit a response from a neurotypical person.

Self-harm isn’t a good thing and should be stopped, sure, but there *are* reasons for it. But instead of figuring out what is actually wrong, many caregivers and so-called experts think the best thing to do is prevent them from hurting themselves instead of trying to find out the problem which is causing the self-harm! There have been many instances where the problem was fixed (could even be something like a flickering lightbulb driving them up the wall, or some sensory thing like that) and the autistic child ceased hurting themselves.

Re: Seizures and epilepsy. Paired with autism, it is a CO-MORBID CONDITION. (just like depression, ADHD, etc which many people with autism also can have) It’s possibly made worse when it comes to sensory overload that autistic people with epilepsy face. Even so, autism does NOT equal epilepsy and vice versa and I think they should be treated as separate things.

Sure, I don’t have epilepsy so I can’t say much about it but I know there’s probably someone out there on the autism spectrum who does that is willing to weigh in on how they deal with it. They may be just one of thousands of people with autism who suffer from seizures but it wouldn’t hurt to just LISTEN to them. 

But that right there brings up my original statement, and your response to me proves this even more. People like you think they know a hell of a lot more than people who actually have autism. It seems like every time an autistic person brings up suggestions as to how they think *their* health, *their* life should be dealt with, a neurotypical person has to butt in and say “No, you’re wrong! You don’t really know that. You should listen to ME because I know BEST”

What, you think I only base my opinion on assumptions and personal experiences? I’ve done my own research- have been researching autism since I was diagnosed at age 14. I’ve communicated with other autistic people (in various degrees of the spectrum) for YEARS. We’ve shared ideas and coping mechanisms. I KNOW that something that works for someone would not necessarily work for me. I’ve learned that first-hand! 

You can’t honestly tell me that listening to people who actually have autism will prevent doctors and scientists from coming up with ways to help them out. The sharing of ideas is important when it comes to forming conclusions! 

I really can’t believe this is even a controversy, Jesus fuck.

This is probably the only thing we will ever agree on.

Good day!

dragember:

silversarcasm:

can we stop funding research to find what ‘causes’ autism and instead use that money to make life more accessible and more comfortable for autistic people

Finding out the cause and other factors of autism makes it easier to make treatments and other methods to properly help people with autism. You can’t create programs that help make life more easy and accessible for people with autism if you don’t understand it.

Believe it or not, autism is already understood.

BY PEOPLE WHO ARE AUTISTIC.

Why not actually listen to those who have autism (who have developed many coping mechanisms and other methods to help them interact with others, how to deal with sensory issues, etc) in order to figure out what helps them and might help other autistic people too?

Just a thought.

Martin Freeman’s drinking game: Take a sip every time someone mentions Benedict Cumberbatch in your interviews

(Source: darlingbenny)

Someone walks over to our step to say hello. She bends at the waist, looming over Brooke.

Brooke doesn’t look up. She doesn’t stop stripping her stick.

Dig. Pull. Dig. Pull.

Our visitor reaches out a hand and cups it below Brooke’s chin.

I freeze. Oh God.

She uses the hand to pull Brooke’s head up by the jaw.

A thin line of panic starts somewhere deep. I know that Brooke is going to scream. 5,4,3,2 …

She does scream, but not in the way that I expect.

“I HATE BEING TOUCHED!!” she shouts.

I am flabbergasted.

Words. Self-awareness. Communication. Self-advocacy.

I know the sentence will need to be reformatted. But I am drenched in pride.

I turn to Brooke. “Great job telling us how you feel, Brooke. Really great job.” I hope that my words send a message to both of them. I stand with my girl.

Our visitor is undaunted.

“I just want to see that beautiful face,” she says. “Lift up for me.”

I am stymied by etiquette. By deference to our host. By generational difference. By convention.

Brooke is not.

She lifts her head as instructed. And growls.

This has probably been posted before, but this knocks me for a loop - a blogger and her autistic daughter had the opportunity to meet Suzanne Wright of Autism Speaks, and this is how one of the noisiest voice in the autism community treated her daughter.

What knocks me for a loop isn’t so much Wright’s awful behavior. It’s the unbelievable strength and self-advocacy that the blogger Jess’s daughter, Brooke, shows when someone violates her personal space. It’s her mother backing her up for making sure someone knows that they are not permitted to touch her unless she says it’s okay. Honestly, it’s heartening. I hope Wright felt real fucking uncomfortable. She should.

(via chantrykomori) YOU GO, GIRL!!!!! (via primadraggle)

I’ve posted about this before but I must reblog it again.

Brooke is a badass!

(Source: spookykomori)

Posted 1 week ago / 729,645 notes #lolwat #snl #will ferrell / Via: mihawkes

vivzie-zp:

corrwill:

ouijasexting:

im fucking crYIN G omfg

I will NEVER not reblog this. ONE OF THE BEST SNL SKITS THEY HAVE EVER DONE!!!

the ending gif, I can’t

(Source: exoergic)

Posted 1 week ago / 123,731 notes #LOLWAT / Via: paintedsaviour

yeevil:

probably not that

(Source: weirdinternet)

stitchlock:

i bet sherlock has to stop deleting “extraneous” non-urban animal breeds because of that time he called a deer a weird dog and john fell to the ground wheezing

mapleglowsticks:

thehat2:

meladoodle:

what do you mean a thesaurus isnt a dinosaur

image

this is adorable as fuck and you can’t tell me otherwise

(Source: meladoodle)

Posted 2 weeks ago / 23,885 notes #david tennant #doctor who / Via: goldenheartedrose

mizgnomer:

Please choose your own favorite way to describe these gifs:

  • The Tenth Doctor putting on the Fifth Doctor’s coat
  • David Tennant putting on Peter Davison’s Doctor’s coat
  • David Tennant putting on his father-in-law’s coat
  • A Doctor Who fan putting on the coat belonging to one of his favorite Doctors
  • Father of The Doctor’s Daughter putting on the coat belonging to the father of The Doctor’s Daughter
  • Complete Doctor Who coat awesomeness

londonphile:

Oh Rory, look at you! All grown up and looking more like your father each day.

image

Posted 2 weeks ago / 25,213 notes #babby / Via: cptprocrastination

awwww-cute:

Shhh the baby is sleeping

awwww-cute:

Shhh the baby is sleeping

sansaofhousestark:

a show is only as good as its filler episodes

and avatar: the last airbender was on a whole other level

(x)

(Source: holmeswilliam)

Posted 2 weeks ago / 339,456 notes #babby / Via: scatteredloops

invaderotaku:

kalliat:

how do boys actually dry their ducks after they shower like

do you just grab it in the towel and roll it between your hands like a dough snake

or do you swing it around to air dry

I need to know

image

(Source: officialkrudd)


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ABOUT

phunkyvanspamVAN FRANCIS SQUIRGLE:
26 year old neurodivergent INTP hobbit from New York. Singer, gamer, jewelry designer, liberal, and nerd.

Lover of The Sims, Dragon Age, Sherlock Holmes (in multiple incarnations), Tolkien, Cabin Pressure, Harry Potter, Benedict Cumberbatch, David Bowie, cult classics, and cute animals. TV Tropes, PBS, and Wikipedia addict. (Read: Soaks up useless info and trivia like a sponge for fun.)

High tolerance for crack art and fics, low tolerance for ignorance. (Basically, do your research)

Interested in following me? You might want to read my disclaimer.

-PHUNKY JUNK N' JEWELS: (My Jewelry Business)


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